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Do British Business People Speak Like This?

A question for my colleagues working in the UK:

Do British business people speak like this?

 

British Business People

Humorous British Expressions

David Paul, president of  the Association “Language Teaching Professionals,”  sent me a link to an amusing list of 30 expressions that the average British person uses.

I’ve selected 15 of the more interesting expressions.

I wonder if British business people speak like this too.

1.  “I might join you later.”  Meaning:  I’m not leaving the house today unless it’s on fire.

2.   “Not to worry.”  Translation: I will never forget this.

3.   Saying “sorry” as a way of introducing yourself.

4.  Ending email with “Thanks” as a warning that you are dangerously  close to losing your temper.

5.  “Right then, I suppose I really should start thinking about possibly making a move.”  Translation: “Bye.”

6.  “It’s fine.”  Meaning:  It really could not possibly get any worse, but no doubt it will do.

7.  “Perfect.” Translation:  Well, that’s that ruined then.

8.  “A bit of a pickle.”  Translation: A catastrophically bad situation with potentially fatal consequences.

9.  “Not too bad actually.”  Translation:  I’m probably the happiest I’ve ever been.

10.  “Honestly, it doesn’t matter.”  Meaning: Nothing has ever mattered more than this.

11.   “That’s certainly one way of looking at it.”  Translation: That’s certainly the wrong way of looking at it.

12.   “No harm done.”  Translation: You’ve caused complete utter chaos.

13.   “With all due respect.”  Translation: You have absolutely no idea what you’re talking about.

14.  “Just whenever you get a minute.”  Translation: “Now.”

15.  “I’m sure will be fine.” Translation: I fully expect the situation to deteriorate rapidly.

My three colleagues working in the UK, Craig, Katie and Jenny know a lot of British business people. Which of these expressions do you think they use?

Please share any other expressions that that you have heard.

For the other 15 expressions that British business people may or may not use, click here.

Image courtesy of stockimages / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

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